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Explore OWASP Top 10 the flagship project crystallizes the most pressing web application vulnerabilities, offering a concise snapshot of the current cyber threat landscape and mapping it to CWE. Explore how the data insights can help in your vulnerability management and application security program. 

What is OWASP?

OWASP, an acronym for the Open Web Application Security Project, is not merely an organization but a global community that is fervently dedicated to improving software security.

Serving as a beacon for developers, security professionals, and organizations, OWASP functions to facilitate the creation of trustworthy software and services. Its mission is rooted in the belief that every piece of software deserves to be secure from inception to deployment.

We explore here one of the flagship projects OWASP Top 10

Phoenix also has an agreement with owasp for free licences 

Explore how the data insights can help in your vulnerability management and application security program. 

owasp top 10, owasp, phoenix security exploitability vulnerability management appsec cisa cisa kev application security programs vulnerability management

Data Explorer: Decoding OWASP Top 10

Explore the data behind OWASP and other interactive charts. The OWASP Top 10 crystallizes the most pressing web application vulnerabilities, offering a concise snapshot of the current cyber threat landscape.

Unlocking Cybersecurity Excellence: Mastering OWASP Top 10

The OWASP Top 10 list serves as a cornerstone in the world of application security. However, like a software patch on Patch Tuesday, this list isn’t static. It evolves to mirror the ever-changing landscape of security vulnerabilities. This post dives into how OWASP Top 10 categories have shifted over the years, offering insights for vulnerability management and application security programs.

 

Explore how the data insights can help in your vulnerability management and application security program. 

 

Methodology

We analyzed a dataset containing OWASP Top 10 categories and their rankings from 2003 to 2021. The aim is to capture the ebbs and flows in the significance of different vulnerabilities, providing a roadmap for application security.

Key Insights

  1. Broken Access Control: This category had no ranking until 2017, where it debuted at number 5. In the 2021 list, it skyrocketed to the top position. That’s like a newcomer stealing the show at a whiskey tasting event!

  2. Sensitive Data Exposure / Cryptographic Failures: Holding steady at the 8th position from 2003 to 2007, it moved up to 7th in 2010 and further ascended to 3rd in 2017 and 2nd in 2021. It’s like a marathoner picking up pace as the finish line approaches.

  3. Injection (Identification & Auth Failure): It’s been a consistent high-performer, like that single malt you can always rely on. Starting at 6th in 2003, it moved up to top positions in subsequent years.

  4. Cross-Site Scripting (XSS): This one has seen some ups and downs, like a scenic run through hilly terrain. It held the top position in 2007, but descended to 7th in 2017 and then climbed back to 3rd in 2021.

  5. Insecure Design (new): This category is a fresh entry in 2021, taking the 4th spot. It’s like when you discover a new running trail that quickly becomes a favorite.

Implications for Phoenix Security

Understanding these shifts is key for Phoenix Security’s vulnerability management strategies. Newer categories like “Broken Access Control” need immediate attention, while maintaining focus on evergreen issues like “Injection.”

 

Data Explorer: Decoding OWASP Top 10

Explore the data behind OWASP and other interactive charts. The OWASP Top 10 crystallizes the most pressing web application vulnerabilities, offering a concise snapshot of the current cyber threat landscape.

Unlocking Cybersecurity Excellence: Mastering OWASP Top 10

OWASP, or the Open Web Application Security Project, is our guiding star in this journey. It’s the definitive source for everything related to application security. If you’re unfamiliar with OWASP, think of it as the guardian angel of your applications, shielding them from the dark forces of the internet. And at the heart of OWASP’s guidance lies the OWASP Top 10.

 

Contribution: https://owasp.org/www-project-top-ten/

The OWASP Top 10: Our North Star in AppSec

The OWASP Top 10 represents the most critical web application security risks, curated by cybersecurity experts from around the globe. It serves as a roadmap to prioritize vulnerabilities and protect your digital assets. In essence, it’s a lifeline for organizations like ours, rooted in vulnerability management and application security.

Now, let’s shed some light on a specific topic – the Phoenix Security Exploitability. Picture this: like a legendary bird that rises from its ashes, the Phoenix Security Exploitability embodies the ability to emerge stronger after security breaches. It’s an art, and we’re the masters of it.

 

A01:2021 – Broken Access Control This category has moved up from the fifth position, indicating its increasing importance. A whopping 94% of applications were tested for some form of broken access control. The 34 Common Weakness Enumerations (CWEs) mapped to Broken Access Control had more occurrences in applications than any other category. It’s clear that ensuring proper access control is a fundamental aspect of application security.

A02:2021 – Cryptographic Failures Previously known as Sensitive Data Exposure, this category has shifted up one position to the #2 spot. The renewed focus here is on failures related to cryptography, which can often lead to sensitive data exposure or system compromise. Proper encryption and cryptographic practices are crucial to safeguarding sensitive information.

A03:2021 – Injection Injection has slid down to the third position but remains a significant concern. Ninety-four percent of the applications were tested for some form of injection. This category includes 33 CWEs, and it’s noteworthy that Cross-site Scripting (XSS) is now part of this category in this edition.

A04:2021 – Insecure Design This is a new category for 2021, emphasizing risks related to design flaws. To “move left” as an industry, it calls for more use of threat modeling, secure design patterns, principles, and reference architectures. Identifying and addressing design flaws early in the development process is crucial for security.

A05:2021 – Security Misconfiguration Security Misconfiguration has moved up from the #6 position in the previous edition. Ninety percent of applications were tested for some form of misconfiguration. With more shifts into highly configurable software, it’s not surprising to see this category move up. XML External Entities (XXE) is now part of this category.

A06:2021 – Vulnerable and Outdated Components This category, previously titled Using Components with Known Vulnerabilities, is #2 in the Top 10 community survey. It has moved up from #9 in 2017 and is a known issue that organizations struggle to test and assess risk. Notably, it is the only category without any Common Vulnerability and Exposures (CVEs) mapped to the included CWEs, making it challenging to manage.

A07:2021 – Identification and Authentication Failures Previously known as Broken Authentication, this category is sliding down from the second position. It now includes CWEs that are more related to identification failures. While it’s still integral to the Top 10, the increased availability of standardized frameworks appears to be helping.

A08:2021 – Software and Data Integrity Failures A new category for 2021, this focuses on making assumptions related to software updates, critical data, and CI/CD pipelines without verifying integrity. Insecure Deserialization from 2017 is now part of this larger category. Ensuring the integrity of software and data is crucial for maintaining security.

A09:2021 – Security Logging and Monitoring Failures Previously Insufficient Logging & Monitoring, this category is added from the industry survey (#3) and has moved up from #10 previously. It’s expanded to include more types of failures. Despite being challenging to test for, failures in this category can directly impact visibility, incident alerting, and forensics.

A10:2021 – Server-Side Request Forgery Added from the Top 10 community survey (#1), this category represents scenarios where the security community members emphasize its importance, even though data may not illustrate its prevalence. It’s a reminder that community insights can be invaluable in shaping security priorities.

 

Data Explorer: CWE and OWASP top 10

Explore how CWE are mapped to OWASP Top 10

In the ever-evolving landscape of application security, two frameworks often emerge as critical benchmarks: OWASP Top 10 and Common Weakness Enumeration (CWE). This post aims to connect the dots between these two essential frameworks by focusing on the frequency of CWEs in the OWASP Top 10 list. Buckle up; it’s going to be a wild ride through the world of exploitability, vulnerability management, and AppSec!

Methodology

The dataset we analyzed consists of multiple instances where CWEs are mapped to OWASP Top 10 categories. For instance, CWE-1004 is mapped to OWASP category A05:2021, which deals with security misconfiguration.

Implications for Phoenix Security

The sheer variety of CWEs mapped to OWASP categories highlights the need for a robust vulnerability management strategy. By focusing on the CWEs most frequently appearing in the OWASP Top 10, Phoenix Security can enhance its exploitability and vulnerability management protocols.

Conclusion

The mapping between CWE and OWASP Top 10 is a crucial element in strengthening application security programs. It aids in the effective allocation of resources for vulnerability management, which is especially vital in AppSec.

So the next time you’re working on your application security, don’t forget to raise a toast to OWASP and CWE. After all, in the words of a famous philosopher: “To secure or not to secure, that is the CVE.”

More details on OWASP

Owasp top 10 has been a pillar over the years; sister to CWE – Common Weakness Enumeration we provide an overview of the top software vulnerabilities and web application security risks with a data-driven approach focused on helping identify what risk to fix first.
Francesco Cipollone
AppSec Phoenix Partnered With OWASP to provide all OWASP member a FOREVER FREE community licence to kick start their journey on appsec & Cloudsec
Francesco Cipollone

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Owasp Top 10 Over the years

owasp top 10, owasp, phoenix security exploitability vulnerability management appsec cisa cisa kev application security programs vulnerability management

OWASP Data across various datasets and years 

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Chris Romeo is a leading voice and thinker in application security, threat modeling, and security champions and the CEO of Devici and General Partner at Kerr Ventures. Chris hosts the award-winning “Application Security Podcast,” “The Security Table,” and “The Threat Modeling Podcast” and is a highly rated industry speaker and trainer, featured at the RSA Conference, the AppSec Village @ DefCon, OWASP Global AppSec, ISC2 Security Congress, InfoSec World and All Day DevOps. Chris founded Security Journey, a security education company, leading to an exit in 2022. Chris was the Chief Security Advocate at Cisco, spreading security knowledge through education and champion programs. Chris has twenty-six years of security experience, holding positions across the gamut, including application security, security engineering, incident response, and various Executive roles. Chris holds the CISSP and CSSLP certifications.

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Jim Manico is the founder of Manicode Security, where he trains software developers on secure coding and security engineering. Jim is also the founder of Brakeman Security, Inc. and an investor/advisor for Signal Sciences. He is the author of Iron-Clad Java: Building Secure Web Applications (McGraw-Hill), a frequent speaker on secure software practices, and a member of the JavaOne Rockstar speaker community. Jim is also a volunteer for and former board member of the OWASP foundation.

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